The Future of Hyundai: Electric Vehicles, Self-Driving Cars, and More

Hyundai is one of the leading automakers in the world, with a reputation for producing reliable, affordable, and innovative vehicles. Hyundai is also one of the most ambitious automakers in terms of its vision for the future, with a plan to launch 23 electric vehicles by 2025, and more than 10 self-driving cars by 2030. Hyundai aims to become a global leader in electrification, mobility, and sustainability, by offering a diverse range of products and services that cater to various customer needs and preferences. In this article, we will explore the future of Hyundai, and how it plans to achieve its goals through electric vehicles, self-driving cars, and more. We will also provide relevant examples, case studies, and statistics to support our points. By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of how Hyundai is shaping the future of the automotive industry, and what you can expect from its upcoming products and services.

Electric Vehicles: Hyundai’s EV Platform and Strategy

Electric vehicles (EVs) are vehicles that run on electricity, rather than gasoline or diesel. EVs have several advantages over conventional vehicles, such as lower emissions, lower operating costs, higher performance, and greater convenience. EVs are also considered to be a key solution for addressing the global challenges of climate change, energy security, and urbanization. However, EVs also face some challenges, such as high initial costs, limited range, and insufficient charging infrastructure. Therefore, EVs require a comprehensive and integrated approach that involves not only the vehicles themselves, but also the battery, the charging system, the software, and the services.

Hyundai is well aware of the opportunities and challenges of EVs, and has developed a dedicated EV platform and strategy to address them. Hyundai’s EV platform is called the Electric-Global Modular Platform (E-GMP), and it is designed to be the base of Hyundai and Kia’s global EV future, starting from 2021. The E-GMP platform has several features and benefits, such as:

  • It is modular, meaning that it can be adapted to various vehicle types, sizes, and shapes, such as sedans, SUVs, crossovers, and even purpose-built vehicles (PBVs), which are customized vehicles for specific purposes, such as delivery, mobility, or entertainment.
  • It is scalable, meaning that it can accommodate different battery sizes and capacities, depending on the vehicle’s range and performance requirements. Hyundai claims that the E-GMP platform can achieve a range of up to 310 miles on a single charge, and can support fast charging up to 350 kW, which can add 60 miles of range in just five minutes.
  • It is efficient, meaning that it can optimize the energy consumption and performance of the vehicle, by using an integrated power electric system, which combines the motor, the transmission, and the inverter into one unit. Hyundai says that this system can increase the motor’s maximum speed by 70 percent, compared to existing motors, despite its small size.
  • It is flexible, meaning that it can support both rear-wheel drive and all-wheel drive configurations, by using one or two electric motors, respectively. The all-wheel drive system can also decouple the front motor from the wheels, when it is not needed, to save energy.
  • It is smart, meaning that it can provide various functions and services, such as vehicle-to-load (V2L), which allows the vehicle to supply electricity to external devices, such as laptops, smartphones, or even other vehicles; vehicle-to-home (V2H), which allows the vehicle to supply electricity to the home, when connected to a bi-directional charger; and vehicle-to-grid (V2G), which allows the vehicle to supply electricity to the grid, when connected to a smart grid system.

Hyundai’s EV strategy is to launch 23 new EVs by 2025, under its three brands: Hyundai, Kia, and Genesis. Hyundai plans to introduce 11 new EVs, including three sedans, six SUVs, one light commercial vehicle, and one new type model, which could be anything from an electric pickup to a tiny electric pod. Kia plans to introduce seven new EVs, including four sedans and three SUVs. Genesis plans to introduce five new EVs, including two sedans and three SUVs. Hyundai aims to sell 1.87 million EVs a year by 2030, and to secure a 7 percent global market share by then.

Self-Driving Cars: Hyundai’s Autonomous Driving Technology and Partnership

Self-driving cars are vehicles that can drive themselves, without human intervention, by using various sensors, cameras, radars, lidars, and software, to perceive the environment, plan the route, and execute the actions. Self-driving cars have several advantages over human-driven cars, such as higher safety, lower congestion, higher productivity, and greater accessibility. Self-driving cars are also considered to be a key solution for enhancing the mobility, convenience, and quality of life of people, especially those who are elderly, disabled, or living in remote areas. However, self-driving cars also face some challenges, such as high complexity, high uncertainty, high regulation, and high liability. Therefore, self-driving cars require a collaborative and innovative approach that involves not only the vehicles themselves, but also the infrastructure, the network, the data, and the services.

Hyundai is well aware of the opportunities and challenges of self-driving cars, and has developed a sophisticated autonomous driving technology and partnership to address them. Hyundai’s autonomous driving technology is called the Highway Driving Assist 2 (HDA 2), and it is designed to be the core of Hyundai and Kia’s self-driving cars, starting from 2021. The HDA 2 technology has several features and benefits, such as:

  • It is capable, meaning that it can perform various driving tasks, such as lane keeping, lane changing, speed control, distance control, and emergency braking, by using various sensors, cameras, radars, and lidars, to detect the surrounding vehicles, pedestrians, road signs, and traffic signals.
  • It is adaptive, meaning that it can adjust to various driving scenarios, such as highway, urban, or rural, by using artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning, to analyze the driving data, and to learn from the driving behavior.
  • It is interactive, meaning that it can communicate with the driver, the passengers, and the other road users, by using various interfaces, such as voice, touch, gesture, and display, to provide information, feedback, and guidance.
  • It is cooperative, meaning that it can cooperate with other vehicles, infrastructure, and network, by using various technologies, such as vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V), vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I), and vehicle-to-everything (V2X), to share data, coordinate actions, and optimize efficiency.

Hyundai’s autonomous driving partnership is with Aptiv, a leading global provider of advanced mobility solutions. Hyundai and Aptiv have formed a joint venture, called Motional, which aims to commercialize self-driving cars by 2022. Motional has several features and benefits, such as:

  • It is experienced, meaning that it has a proven track record of developing and deploying self-driving cars, with more than 100 million miles driven in complex and diverse environments, across the U.S., Europe, and Asia.
  • It is innovative, meaning that it has a strong research and development capability, with more than 1000 engineers, scientists, and experts, working on cutting-edge technologies, such as computer vision, sensor fusion, machine learning, and cloud computing.
  • It is collaborative, meaning that it has a broad and diverse network of partners, including automakers, ride-hailing companies, technology companies, and government agencies, working together to create a safe, reliable, and scalable self-driving ecosystem.
  • It is visionary, meaning that it has a clear and ambitious vision of transforming mobility, by making self-driving cars accessible, affordable, and enjoyable, for everyone, everywhere.

More: Hyundai’s Other Future Products and Services

Besides electric vehicles and self-driving cars, Hyundai has also been working on other future products and services, that aim to enhance the mobility, sustainability, and well-being of people. Some of these products and services are:

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are vehicles that run on hydrogen, rather than electricity or gasoline. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have several advantages over conventional vehicles, such as zero emissions, high efficiency, and long range. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are also considered to be a key solution for achieving a hydrogen society, which is a society that uses hydrogen as a clean and renewable energy source, for various applications, such as transportation, power generation, and heating.

The Future of Hyundai: Electric Vehicles, Self-Driving Cars, and More

Hyundai is one of the leading automakers in the world, with a reputation for producing reliable, affordable, and innovative vehicles. Hyundai is also one of the most ambitious automakers in terms of its vision for the future, with a plan to launch 23 electric vehicles by 2025, and more than 10 self-driving cars by 2030. Hyundai aims to become a global leader in electrification, mobility, and sustainability, by offering a diverse range of products and services that cater to various customer needs and preferences. In this article, we will explore the future of Hyundai, and how it plans to achieve its goals through electric vehicles, self-driving cars, and more. We will also provide relevant examples, case studies, and statistics to support our points. By the end of this article, you will have a better understanding of how Hyundai is shaping the future of the automotive industry, and what you can expect from its upcoming products and services.

Electric Vehicles: Hyundai’s EV Platform and Strategy

Electric vehicles (EVs) are vehicles that run on electricity, rather than gasoline or diesel. EVs have several advantages over conventional vehicles, such as lower emissions, lower operating costs, higher performance, and greater convenience. EVs are also considered to be a key solution for addressing the global challenges of climate change, energy security, and urbanization. However, EVs also face some challenges, such as high initial costs, limited range, and insufficient charging infrastructure. Therefore, EVs require a comprehensive and integrated approach that involves not only the vehicles themselves, but also the battery, the charging system, the software, and the services.

Hyundai is well aware of the opportunities and challenges of EVs, and has developed a dedicated EV platform and strategy to address them. Hyundai’s EV platform is called the Electric-Global Modular Platform (E-GMP), and it is designed to be the base of Hyundai and Kia’s global EV future, starting from 2021. The E-GMP platform has several features and benefits, such as:

  • It is modular, meaning that it can be adapted to various vehicle types, sizes, and shapes, such as sedans, SUVs, crossovers, and even purpose-built vehicles (PBVs), which are customized vehicles for specific purposes, such as delivery, mobility, or entertainment.
  • It is scalable, meaning that it can accommodate different battery sizes and capacities, depending on the vehicle’s range and performance requirements. Hyundai claims that the E-GMP platform can achieve a range of up to 310 miles on a single charge, and can support fast charging up to 350 kW, which can add 60 miles of range in just five minutes.
  • It is efficient, meaning that it can optimize the energy consumption and performance of the vehicle, by using an integrated power electric system, which combines the motor, the transmission, and the inverter into one unit. Hyundai says that this system can increase the motor’s maximum speed by 70 percent, compared to existing motors, despite its small size.
  • It is flexible, meaning that it can support both rear-wheel drive and all-wheel drive configurations, by using one or two electric motors, respectively. The all-wheel drive system can also decouple the front motor from the wheels, when it is not needed, to save energy.
  • It is smart, meaning that it can provide various functions and services, such as vehicle-to-load (V2L), which allows the vehicle to supply electricity to external devices, such as laptops, smartphones, or even other vehicles; vehicle-to-home (V2H), which allows the vehicle to supply electricity to the home, when connected to a bi-directional charger; and vehicle-to-grid (V2G), which allows the vehicle to supply electricity to the grid, when connected to a smart grid system.

Hyundai’s EV strategy is to launch 23 new EVs by 2025, under its three brands: Hyundai, Kia, and Genesis. Hyundai plans to introduce 11 new EVs, including three sedans, six SUVs, one light commercial vehicle, and one new type model, which could be anything from an electric pickup to a tiny electric pod. Kia plans to introduce seven new EVs, including four sedans and three SUVs. Genesis plans to introduce five new EVs, including two sedans and three SUVs. Hyundai aims to sell 1.87 million EVs a year by 2030, and to secure a 7 percent global market share by then.

Self-Driving Cars: Hyundai’s Autonomous Driving Technology and Partnership

Self-driving cars are vehicles that can drive themselves, without human intervention, by using various sensors, cameras, radars, lidars, and software, to perceive the environment, plan the route, and execute the actions. Self-driving cars have several advantages over human-driven cars, such as higher safety, lower congestion, higher productivity, and greater accessibility. Self-driving cars are also considered to be a key solution for enhancing the mobility, convenience, and quality of life of people, especially those who are elderly, disabled, or living in remote areas. However, self-driving cars also face some challenges, such as high complexity, high uncertainty, high regulation, and high liability. Therefore, self-driving cars require a collaborative and innovative approach that involves not only the vehicles themselves, but also the infrastructure, the network, the data, and the services.

Hyundai is well aware of the opportunities and challenges of self-driving cars, and has developed a sophisticated autonomous driving technology and partnership to address them. Hyundai’s autonomous driving technology is called the Highway Driving Assist 2 (HDA 2), and it is designed to be the core of Hyundai and Kia’s self-driving cars, starting from 2021. The HDA 2 technology has several features and benefits, such as:

  • It is capable, meaning that it can perform various driving tasks, such as lane keeping, lane changing, speed control, distance control, and emergency braking, by using various sensors, cameras, radars, and lidars, to detect the surrounding vehicles, pedestrians, road signs, and traffic signals.
  • It is adaptive, meaning that it can adjust to various driving scenarios, such as highway, urban, or rural, by using artificial intelligence, machine learning, and deep learning, to analyze the driving data, and to learn from the driving behavior.
  • It is interactive, meaning that it can communicate with the driver, the passengers, and the other road users, by using various interfaces, such as voice, touch, gesture, and display, to provide information, feedback, and guidance.
  • It is cooperative, meaning that it can cooperate with other vehicles, infrastructure, and network, by using various technologies, such as vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V), vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I), and vehicle-to-everything (V2X), to share data, coordinate actions, and optimize efficiency.

Hyundai’s autonomous driving partnership is with Aptiv, a leading global provider of advanced mobility solutions. Hyundai and Aptiv have formed a joint venture, called Motional, which aims to commercialize self-driving cars by 2022. Motional has several features and benefits, such as:

  • It is experienced, meaning that it has a proven track record of developing and deploying self-driving cars, with more than 100 million miles driven in complex and diverse environments, across the U.S., Europe, and Asia.
  • It is innovative, meaning that it has a strong research and development capability, with more than 1000 engineers, scientists, and experts, working on cutting-edge technologies, such as computer vision, sensor fusion, machine learning, and cloud computing.
  • It is collaborative, meaning that it has a broad and diverse network of partners, including automakers, ride-hailing companies, technology companies, and government agencies, working together to create a safe, reliable, and scalable self-driving ecosystem.
  • It is visionary, meaning that it has a clear and ambitious vision of transforming mobility, by making self-driving cars accessible, affordable, and enjoyable, for everyone, everywhere.

More: Hyundai’s Other Future Products and Services

Besides electric vehicles and self-driving cars, Hyundai has also been working on other future products and services, that aim to enhance the mobility, sustainability, and well-being of people. Some of these products and services are:

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are vehicles that run on hydrogen, rather than electricity or gasoline. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have several advantages over conventional vehicles, such as zero emissions, high efficiency, and long range. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are also considered to be a key solution for achieving a hydrogen society, which is a society that uses hydrogen as a clean and renewable energy source, for various applications, such as transportation, power generation, and heating.

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